chartered wealth manager accredited financial analyst financial planner ISO 9001 Accredited Certification Body Training 

AFA Accredited Financial Analyst - Financial Planner Certified Chartered Certifications ™

 
<< Previous    1...   47  48  [49]  50  51  ...91    Next >>

A Word About "No-Load" Funds  

Some funds call themselves "no-load." As the name implies, this means that the fund does not charge any type of sales load. But, as discussed above, not every type of shareholder fee is a "sales load." A no-load fund may charge fees that are not sales loads, such as purchase fees, redemption fees, exchange fees, and account fees. No-load funds will also have operating expenses. 

Be sure to review carefully the fee tables of any funds you're considering, including no-load funds. Even small differences in fees can translate into large differences in returns over time. For example, if you invested $10,000 in a fund that produced a 10% annual return before expenses and had annual operating expenses of 1.5%, then after 20 years you would have roughly $49,725. But if the fund had expenses of only 0.5%, then you would end up with $60,858 — an 18% difference. 

A mutual fund cost calculator can help you understand the impact that many types of fees and expenses can have over time. It takes only minutes to compare the costs of different mutual funds. 

A Word About Breakpoints  

Some mutual funds that charge front-end sales loads will charge lower sales loads for larger investments. The investment levels required to obtain a reduced sales load are commonly referred to as "breakpoints." 

The SEC does not require a fund to offer breakpoints in the fund's sales load. But, if breakpoints exist, the fund must disclose them. In addition, a NASD member brokerage firm should not sell you shares of a fund in an amount that is "just below" the fund's sales load breakpoint simply to earn a higher commission.   Each fund company establishes its own formula for how they will calculate whether an investor is entitled to receive a breakpoint. For that reason, it is important to seek out breakpoint information from your financial advisor or the fund itself. You'll need to ask how a particular fund establishes eligibility for breakpoint discounts, as well as what the fund's breakpoint amounts are.   

Classes of Funds 

Many mutual funds offer more than one class of shares. For example, you may have seen a fund that offers "Class A" and "Class B" shares. Each class will invest in the same "pool" (or investment portfolio) of securities and will have the same investment objectives and policies. But each class will have different shareholder services and/or distribution arrangements with different fees and expenses. As a result, each class will likely have different performance results.  A multi-class structure offers investors the ability to select a fee and expense structure that is most appropriate for their investment goals (including the time that they expect to remain invested in the fund). Here are some key characteristics of the most common mutual fund share classes offered to individual investors: 

  • Class A Shares— Class A shares typically impose a front-end sales load. They also tend to have a lower 12b-1 fee and lower annual expenses than other mutual fund share classes. Be aware that some mutual funds reduce the front-end load as the size of your investment increases. If you're considering Class A shares, be sure to inquire about breakpoints.
       
  • Class B Shares— Class B shares typically do not have a front-end sales load. Instead, they may impose a contingent deferred sales load and a 12b-1 fee (along with other annual expenses). Class B shares also might convert automatically to a class with a lower 12b-1 fee if the investor holds the shares long enough.
       
  • Class C Shares — Class C shares might have a 12b-1 fee, other annual expenses, and either a front- or back-end sales load. But the front- or back-end load for Class C shares tends to be lower than for Class A or Class B shares, respectively. Unlike Class B shares, Class C shares generally do not convert to another class. Class C shares tend to have higher annual expenses than either Class A or Class B shares.  

 

Tax Consequences 

When you buy and hold an individual stock or bond, you must pay income tax each year on the dividends or interest you receive. But you won't have to pay any capital gains tax until you actually sell and unless you make a profit. 

<< Previous    1...   47  48  [49]  50  51  ...91    Next >>

 
About
Certifications
Board
Requirements
Certification Benefits
Application
Accredited
Contact
Send CV for Approval
Qualifying Degrees
FINRA GUIDE
CEO Message
Training Providers
Mission
Ethics
News
Articles
Verify Member
In House Training
Speakers
Global Advisors
Handbook
Become Provider
AAPM
TUV Accreditation
Renew Certification
Continuing Ed
Accreditations
Site Map

Validate and Verify Member Here

 

TUV Accredited

 

Certified Management Consultant 

Home About Certifications Board Requirements Certification Benefits Application Contact Us Accredited Contact Send CV for Approval Apply AFAPPC GetCertifiedPPC Chartered Wealth Manager News How To Use Stock Markets Qualifying Degrees Training Calendar FINRA GUIDE CEO Message Reg. Payments Training Providers About Old Events CWM Training Program Mission Ethics News UBT University Business Technology Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia - Certification Training Programs 2017 - University Business & Technology Articles Chartered Certified Economist FINRA Chartered Wealth Manager Training Verify Member Guides Informa GAFM Guides In House Training Speakers Global Advisors Membership Governmental Recognition Links Handbook mfm Financial Planner Program Chartered Economist CCO Higher Institute IP List Become Provider Management Consulting Jobs TUV Accreditation CWM Chartered Wealth Manager Terms Financial Analyst Certification Copy of Certification Economics Certification Economics Degrees Management Degrees Finance Degrees Accounting Degrees Renew Certification Awards Sample Trademarks Careers Complaint Site Map Mentz George Mentz Lawyer Mentz George Colorado USA Speaker Consultant AFA ® Accredited Financial Analyst Certification CTEP ® Trust and Estate Certification CIPM ® Certified International Project Manager CWM ® Chartered Wealth Manager ® AMA ® Management Accountant Certification AMC ® Management Consulting Certification MMC ® Management Consulting Certification Book

Google Plus 

All Rights Reserved 1996-2017 -  GAFM Global Academy of Finance and Management   & Association for Finance and Management
 Mentzinger Media LLC   Board of Standards - Accreditation and  Certification - Global Certified  Accountants Financial Analysts Institute 
Association of International Financial Accounting  Foregin Relations Public Policy Council  Chartered Wealth Manager
Accredited Financial Analyst Certified Chartered Management Accountant   - Association Institute Academy 
US Department of Labor  - George Mentz
Join us on LinkedIn  - Financial Analyst Training - Chartered Wealth Manager ® - ChE Chartered Economist ®
 
www.GAFM.us * www.GAFM.org
In alliance with the Unincorported Non-Profit Association of Finance and Management USA
 
A financial analyst  securities analyst, research analyst, equity analyst, or investment analyst is a person who performs financial analysis for external or internal clients as a core part of the job. Financial analysis (also referred to as financial statement analysis or accounting analysis or Analysis of finance) refers to an assessment of the viability, stability and profitability of a business, sub-business or project. It is performed by professionals who prepare reports using ratios that make use of information taken from financial statements and other reports. These reports are usually presented to top management as one of their bases in making business decisions. Certification as a financial analyst requires accredited education in finance
 
Management consulting is the practice of helping organizations to improve their performance, primarily through the analysis of existing organizational problems and development of plans for improvement. Organizations may draw upon the services of management consultants for a number of reasons, including gaining external (and presumably objective) advice and access to the consultants' specialized expertise. Becoming certified in management consulting requires proper education experience and credentials.
 
Management accounting or managerial accounting is concerned with the provisions and use of accounting information to managers within organizations, to provide them with the basis to make informed business decisions that will allow them to be better equipped in their management and control functions. Cost accounting is a process of collecting, analyzing, summarizing and evaluating various alternative courses of action. Its goal is to advise the management on the most appropriate course of action based on the cost efficiency and capability. Cost accounting provides the detailed cost information that management needs to control current operations and plan for the future. Certification in management or cost accounting requires education and expertise in accounting.
 
IP/Rights Global